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Real Talk: 5 Things You Should Know About Melanoma

skin cancer facts

Skin Cancer Awareness Month might be over, but it’s never too late to have some real talk about the epidemic of melanoma, specifically.

Our mission here at Supergoop! has always been to stop the epidemic of skin cancer. And melanoma in particular is no joke. So in a way it’s our duty to make sure everyone knows just how serious it is – and most importantly that you understand what you can do to prevent it. Read on for five eye-opening facts…

1. In 2019, 192,000 Americans will be diagnosed with melanoma.

That’s a 7.7 percent increase from 2018. It’s also important to note that melanoma is skin cancer in its deadliest and most dangerous form, and an estimated 7,200 Americans will die from it in 2019.

The takeaway: It’s honestly never been more important to protect your skin from the damaging effects of the sun. After all, research also shows that about 90 percent of melanomas are preventable with proper sun safety habits. (More on that later…)

2. Melanoma is the number one most diagnosed cancer for women between the ages of 25 and 29.

And your risk is higher if one of your first-degree relatives – like your mom, dad or siblings – has had skin cancer.

3. No skin tone, texture or type is “off limits” from getting melanoma.

You may think that if you never get a visible sunburn or if you have darker skin then you’re less susceptible to skin cancer, but that’s just not true. In fact, those who don’t burn easily are often the most at risk for a late stage diagnosis, which is life-threatening.

4. The more sunburns you get, the higher your risk of melanoma becomes.

In fact, a person’s risk of developing melanoma doubles when they’ve had more than five sunburns. Furthermore, your risk increases by 75 percent when you go to a tanning bed.

5. There are two easy things you can do to prevent melanoma.

Now finally for some good news… The first thing you can do decrease your risk for melanoma is simple (and one we really believe in): daily SPF. Yup, that’s it. Here are some pointers:

The next thing you should do to prevent melanoma is always schedule a yearly skin exam with a board-certified dermatologist you trust. Regular skin checks with your dermatologist help prevent melanoma, and with the appropriate care it has a cure rate of 98%.

During a skin check, your derm will examine literally every inch of your body to check for any suspicious freckles and moles. They will also biopsy any especially sketchy spots before anything can turn into melanoma.

Even if you wear sunscreen all the time and haven’t had a sunburn in years, it’s super important to get a skin exam every single year. Your dermatologist is trained to spot things that your untrained eye can’t see.

+ We hope this was helpful even though it was more on the serious side! Do you have more questions about melanoma and skin cancer? Leave them below and we’ll answer them!